When matching food and wine - simply think of matching the strength of flavours and weight of the dish with the wine. Wine and food are meant for each other; each enhances and strengthens the experience of the whole, they bring out the best in each other.
Consider whether a dish is ‘light’ or 'heavy' in nature - in general, look to pair a light-bodied wine to go with a light dish, a medium-bodied wine to match a fuller dish, and a full-bodied wine to go with a heavy dish. For the following examples - try to focus on the flavours in each different meat dish, the same way you think about the flavours in wine - as families of flavours. The following wine and meat suggestions - are just that, suggestions and starting points - as there are so many different wines in the world - there are so many varied ways to cut, cure, season, cook and serve meat cuisine.
The following matches are only suggestions, guidelines and starting points - enjoy the journey.

You are looking to complement the more subtle, slightly sweeter favours and seams of thin fat in the slowly cooked, most ham meat and any glaze on the skin.
So you need a soft style wine, with good fruit notes, medium in palate weight and with soft tannins to release the flavours and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair with cured hams, though with moist, sweet ham pair with a slightly oaked Chardonnay or Gruner Veltliner.
Red Wine:
A Rosé wine, a light Valpolicella, young, light style Rioja and even a light style Chianti, a Beaujolais, Merlot or even a light Malbec.
 
You are looking to complement the layered sweet and infused seasoned, smoky notes and the sweet grains of fat in these cured hams.
So you need a medium intensity style wine, with ripe fruit flavours and with good tannins to release the sweet, earthy meat flavours and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair with cured, seasoned meats, though try an oaked Chardonnay or a quality Vermentino or Gruner Veltliner.
Red Wine:
A Rosé wine, a light Valpolicella, young, Rioja, a medium style Chianti, a lightly oaked Carménère or a light Syrah.
 
You are looking to complement the subtle sweet, gamey characters in the medium dark meat and the veins of fat and the subtle cooking techniques used.
So you need a medium intensity style wine, with ripe fruit flavours and with good tannins and integrated oak to release the rabbit meat flavours and cleanse the palate
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair with gamey meat, though try an oak aged Chardonnay or a quality barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja Reserva, Chianti DOCG, a quality Pinot Noir, and a Grenache / Syrah blend will pair very well.
 
You are looking to complement the subtle crisp bacon notes, with the herbs and cream sauce and the texture of the Pasta used.
So you need a medium intensity style wine, with ripe fruit flavours, medium palate weight, with soft tannins and subtle oak notes to release the bacon and sauce flavours in the dish and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair, though try a quality barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A light to medium style Chianti, a quality Primitivo or a lightly oaked Merlot / Cabernet blend, even a light Syrah can pair very well.
 
You are looking to complement the natural juicy gamey characters in the medium rich meat, the sweet fats and the different cooking techniques used to prepare the dish.
So you need a medium intensity style wine, with ripe fruit flavours, good tannins and well balanced oak notes to release the flavours in the Duck and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair, though try a quality oak aged or better still, a well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja Crianza, a medium to full flavoured Chianti DOCG, a quality Pinot Noir or a lightly oaked Grenache / Syrah blend will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the sweeter, juicy, slow cooked flavours and the layers of fat in the Pork and the different cooking techniques used to prepare the dish.
So you need a medium style wine, with ripe fruit flavours, good tannins and well integrated oak notes to release the flavours in the Pork and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair, though try a quality oak aged or better still, a well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Bardolino, Rioja Crianza, a medium style Chianti, Valpolicella, a quality Pinot Noir or a lightly oaked G/S/M blend will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, herbs, cooked meat notes and the fats in the meat balls, and in the pasta, sauce and the olive oil used in the cooking.
So you need a medium to full style wine, with ripe fruit flavours, good tannins and oak characters to release the flavours in the meat balls and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair, though try a quality oak aged or better still, a well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja Reserva, a medium to full style Chianti Classico, a G/S/M or even a Merlot / Cabernet Sauvignon blend will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, herbs, simple meat characters and the sweeter fats in the sausage meat and all the seasoning used in the different types of sausages.
So you need a smooth, medium style wine, with ripe fruit notes and with soft tannins and balanced oak to release the flavours in the sausages and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair strong flavoured sausages, though try a quality oak aged or better still, a well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja, a medium style Chianti, a G/S/M or a Merlot / Cabernet blend, or a light Syrah will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, spices, meat flavours and the mixed fats in the meat patties and the chosen additions and sauces used in the burgers.
So you need a medium style wine with ripe fruits, soft tannins and subtle oak notes to release the flavours in the burgers and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair strong flavoured burgers, though try a quality, well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja Reserva, Primitivo, Chianti Classico, a light Syrah, G/S/M or a Merlot / Cabernet blend, or a lightly oaked Malbec will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, spices, gravy, pastry and meat flavours and the layers of fat in the meat and the gravy sauce.
So you need a fuller style wine with ripe fruits, firm tannins and will good well integrated oak to release the flavours in the meat, gravy and crusty pastry and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair strong flavours, though try a quality, well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja Reserva, Chianti Classico DOCG, Syrah / Shiraz, a Cabernet / Merlot blend, or a light oaked Carménère will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the rich, gamey, earthy notes and the infused sweet fats in the medium rich meat, due to the slow cooking technique used.
So you need a fuller, richer style wine, with ripe fruit flavours, and with good tannins and firm oak notes to release the flavours in the rich Lamb Shank and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair; though try a quality, well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Rioja Gran Reserva, Chianti Classico DOCG, a quality Syrah, or medium style Shiraz, a Cabernet / Merlot blend, or a Nebbiolo will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, spices, richer meat notes and the layers of fat in the cubes of meat and the grilled cooking flavours that have caramelized the edges.
So you need a fuller, richer style wine, with rich, ripe fruit flavours, and with good tannins and oak notes to release the flavours in the Kebabs and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be slightly difficult to pair; though try a quality, well-crafted barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Nebbiolo, Rioja Gran Reserva, Chianti Classico DOCG, a quality Syrah, or medium to full style Shiraz, plus a ripe Cabernet Sauvignon will pair well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, richer, slow cooked meat flavours and the layers of fat in the meat and the cooking techniques used for these larger pieces of meat.
So you need a fuller, richer style wine, with rich, ripe fruit flavours, and with firm tannins and integrated oak notes to release the flavours in the roasted meats and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be very difficult to pair; though you could try a quality, well-crafted, barrel fermented Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A Nebbiolo, Rioja Gran Reserva, Chianti Classico DOCG, a premium quality Shiraz, a full flavoured, good structured Cabernet Sauvignon will pair very well.
 
You are looking to complement the seasoning, subtle spices used and the meat flavours and the layers of fat in the cuts of quality meat and the chosen cooking techniques used.
So you need a full style wine, with rich, ripe fruit flavours, and with firm tannins and quality integrated oak to release the flavours in the premium steak cuts and cleanse the palate.
White Wine:
It can be very difficult to pair; though try a quality, well-crafted, barrel fermented, rich, layered Chardonnay.
Red Wine:
A premium quality Nebbiolo, Rioja Gran Reserva, Chianti Reserva, a rich Shiraz, plus a quality, full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon will pair very well.